E-Decluttering. New ish.

I recently completed a full digital detox. I deleted Snap Chat, Instagram and WhatsApp, forced people to call me when they needed something and generally tried to use the phone less and be in the present more. I stripped away distractions so that I could really focus on what’s really important. It was pretty extreme but it was necessary.

See, this all happened because of minimalism. When you successfully devalue “stuff” like unnecessary clothing, toys, shoes etc, you rid yourself of material dependence and open yourself up to really finding causes and interests dear to you, everything else begins to feel like a distraction. Without all the “stuff” (in this case e-stuff), I felt a sense of clarity and focus I hadn’t felt in a long time. I felt engaged and connected because of the deliberate disconnection.

I really wish I had better words to describe the feeling of devaluing “stuff” and the freedom it brings. When what you wear, what car you drive, what jewelry you own is no longer a defining characteristic you can really begin to cultivate the real you. It’s so freeing. Physical decluttering leads to mental declutter that leads to soul search.

The sense of lightness that allows for inward reflection is really addicting. The freeing of time that allows you to do more is invaluable.

Anne Lamott said it best “Almost everything will work again, if you unplug it… including you.”

Minimalism isn’t just about physical decluttering, although that has a lot to do with it. It also is about decluttering your mind. One way to achieve that, is to unplug.

Try it out: digital detox for the rest of the week. Delete the app you feel you cant live without. And remember, it’ll still be there when/if you decide to download it again.

Sue Khan